Formspring.me

Formspring.me Screen Shot

I enjoy experimenting with new social networks and social media. I’m curious about the ways people are using social media, so I will often make accounts on any new thing that comes along. I was an early-ish adopter of Twitter and Tumbler back in 2007, and now those two platforms are pretty popular.

One of the new social media toys that early adopters are checking out is formspring.me. It’s a platform on which you can answer anonymous questions from people who visit your formspring.me page.

The service is fairly no-frills. Each question has a permalink for easy sharing. You can’t comment on people’s questions and answers. Once you answer a question, you can’t edit it to correct typos or add information. You can link your formspring.me page to your Twitter, Tumblr, and Facebook accounts to cross-pollinate across the major social networks. When you answer a question, you have the flexibility to choose which if your other accounts to cross-post to.

All questions are moderated, and the account holder chooses which questions to answer, so there’s no risk that offensive questions would get displayed without consent. Though, of course, that doesn’t prevent people from leaving anonymous abusive comments in the first place. Having been doing the blogging thing for a while, I’m used to people leaving the occasional abusive, threatening comments on my blog. The potential to experience the same thing on formspring.me isn’t much of an issue for me personally, but others’ mileage may vary.

I’ve seen people using formspring.me as intended: as a personal Q&A page, though I’ve also seen some out-of-the-box uses, like using it to carry on an extremely (to me) disjointed and (to me) incoherent conversation with anonymous (?) commenters. This phenonmenon is similar to Tumblr users carrying on conversations through reblogging each others’ posts, which evolved partly due to the fact that Tumblr doesn’t have a native comment system installed. If formspring.me gains traction, we’ll probably see other interesting uses.

In the future, I’ll probably post some of the more interesting game-related questions I get through formspring.me on this blog. I’ve been cross-posting to Twitter, but I don’t feel the need to do the same on Tumblr or Facebook.

Meanwhile, you can ask me a question on my formspring.me page:

  1 comment for “Formspring.me

  1. Beverly
    17 February 2010 at 01:06

    Thank You for the tip! It is an interesting concept, personally I get overwhelmed by all the social media websites that seem to emerge every other day

    Has anyone played with Google’s Buzz much?

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